Too Many topics. But let's start here.
a few thoughts from Mrs. Napoli

I've noticed at least three or four things that have been related to me or in the news that I'd like to write on. I'll pick from them for doing an evening post to the weblog, but for now, the most timely of all the topics would be Celeste Calvitto's excellent column in the Rapid City Journal today with the wife of Bill Napoli regarding the political poll being conducted in the Napoli/McCoy Race.

The Napoli/McCoy race is the story that just won't settle down, and I continue to predict that this will be the white-hot contest to watch during the primary election season. Here's a snippet from the Calvitto article with Peggy Napoli discussing the poll in the Rapid City Journal:
"We already knew about it," she said. "The thing that was interesting is that an older lady came up to us in a restaurant and said they asked her if she would vote for Bill if she knew he was against senior citizens. I wasn't asked that question."

Peggy Napoli took notes on the exchange with the caller from Midwest Research and was able to recite every question she was asked. There isn't any way I can list all of them in this column, but they were wide-ranging, such as: What is the most important issue facing South Dakota? Should creationism be taught along with intelligent design in the public schools? Should state government do something about making health insurance and prescription drugs less expensive?

In response to a question about what the highest priorities of the Republican Party should be - moral issues such as abortion or gay rights, to promote limited government, or "undecided" - Peggy Napoli said: "Don't we have any more choices than this? I made the person read it back to me three times. ... The person who did the survey was very patient and personable."

Then, there were questions about Bill Napoli and Rep. Alice McCoy, R-Rapid City, who are likely opponents in a District 35 primary in June. McCoy cannot seek re-election to her house seat next year because of term limits.

When asked to talk about the strengths and weaknesses of her husband, Peggy Napoli said she replied, "So, how much time do you have?"
Read the best SD news interview of the week here.

This polling questions as related in this article are.... well they're just a little weird. While I'm no acquainted with him personally, Bill Napoli has always struck me as fiscally conservative as opposed to campaigning on issues of social conservatism. It's those fiscal issues he's been extremely vocal on.

I couldn't guess his position on creationism if I tried. In doing a search, I do see that many of his positions on those issues are conservative, and pretty much the same as his potential opponent. So why all the polling on social issues?

Clearly, someone is trying to see if they can set the stage of the election on those terms - on issues of social conservatism.

Do a search on the Rapid City Journal website, and Alice is often quoted as the pro-life legislator on abortion. She's certainly quoted often enough on it. But then look at some of her fiscal positions. From the Rapid City Journal's 2004 election questions, and Alice McCoy's response:
Q: What fiscal plan would you support if voters repeal the state sales tax on groceries?

I would love to start a "voluntary food tax trust fund." Anyone who doesn't mind paying tax on food or just wants to pay more taxes can contribute.

A penny on luxury items more than they are now.

A penny on pet food.

We have $5 million from the food refund program.
Voluntary food tax? A penny on pet food? Let's compare that to Napoli's answer to the same question:
Q: What fiscal plan would you support if voters repeal the state sales tax on groceries?

I will support whatever the people of South Dakota decide. If the repeal passes, I will work to implement the repeal through cuts in government. I will not support tax or fee increases, nor will I support new taxes, especially property tax increases. If the people want tax relief by repealing tax on food, it is the duty of all legislators to honor this decision and deal with it.

In the late '70s, Gov. Bill Janklow cut government 5 percent across the board. The cuts were hardly felt. We can do the same. Decrease in spending and growth in revenues should get us through. I must caution voters: For those who think they can raise replacement revenue, this will be incredibly difficult. We will need very strong leadership to keep other taxes and fees from being increased. We will all see some reduction in services. Think this matter over carefully, then vote your convictions.
Okay. I think we can see who put a little more thought into it.

It's entirely possible that the polling was conducted to see if District 35 could be won on the basis of Alice's role as the "go to legislator" for media quotes in the Rapid City Area on the pro-life side of the abortion debate. But, that's just idle speculation on my part.

Going back to today's Calvitto article, there were another question that were pointed out by the Senator's wife in the polling conducted that intrigued me:

"And here was a zinger," she said. "'He's part of an ultra-conservative group that was formed to attack fellow Republicans. Will this affect the outcome of your vote?'"
So, is the person vocal in pro-life social conservativism going to go after the person who holds many of the same views, but is primarily viewed as a fiscal conservative for being an ultra conservative?

What I think is going to happen, is that it's going to come down to runs the better campaign.

But, that's a conservative guess on my part.

Comments

Nicholas Nemec said…
"should creationism be taught along with intelligent design" WTF! The end really is near.
Anonymous said…
Fiscal conservative? Hmm, he sure couldn't wait to vote for a $20 million hole in the ground . . . that just happened to be in the Black Hills.
Anonymous said…
"Do a search on the Rapid City Journal website, and Alice is often quoted as the pro-life legislator on abortion. She's certainly quoted often enough on it. But then look at some of her fiscal positions. From the Rapid City Journal's 2004 election questions, and Alice McCoy's response:

Q: What fiscal plan would you support if voters repeal the state sales tax on groceries?

I would love to start a "voluntary food tax trust fund." Anyone who doesn't mind paying tax on food or just wants to pay more taxes can contribute.

A penny on luxury items more than they are now.

A penny on pet food.

We have $5 million from the food refund program.
Voluntary food tax? A penny on pet food? Let's compare that to Napoli's answer to the same question:

Q: What fiscal plan would you support if voters repeal the state sales tax on groceries?

I will support whatever the people of South Dakota decide. If the repeal passes, I will work to implement the repeal through cuts in government. I will not support tax or fee increases, nor will I support new taxes, especially property tax increases. If the people want tax relief by repealing tax on food, it is the duty of all legislators to honor this decision and deal with it.

In the late '70s, Gov. Bill Janklow cut government 5 percent across the board. The cuts were hardly felt. We can do the same. Decrease in spending and growth in revenues should get us through. I must caution voters: For those who think they can raise replacement revenue, this will be incredibly difficult. We will need very strong leadership to keep other taxes and fees from being increased. We will all see some reduction in services. Think this matter over carefully, then vote your convictions.
Okay. I think we can see who put a little more thought into it."




As for that I read that and Alice goes right to the point. Bill talks and talks......on and on. I got board and forgot most of it. I had to read it twice to understand what he was talking about. I like that straight out facts. I have things to do today not re-read something dull.

Popular posts from this blog

Breaking News: After the television commercial salvo fired at them, Vote Yes For Life Fires back.

Heidepreim: Republicans are the party of hate

The Day in politics - October 24th