More internet thoughts from Representative Kristi Noem.
How do you discuss your faith in a campaign setting?

I had noted a week or so ago that Representative Kristi Noem is writing and blogging regularly for the "everyday woman" website. Today's clips from that website are from one of her most recent contributions, specifically to their on-line magazine:
God always brings me back to a very small, yet key, moment in my past. When I was a young girl, I struggled with finding a purpose for my life—not just the perfect purpose, but any purpose! I was chubby, not-so-cute (at least in my eyes), and had suffered through bouts of teasing that sometimes occur in the lives of grade-school children.

But one day my whole perspective changed. My mother had become very concerned for my welfare and asked me to sit at the kitchen table with her one afternoon after a tough day at school. She shared with me Deuteronomy 28:13 which told God’s view of my life and what He had in store for me. Then she shared her vision of me and how she saw me as someone that God did not place at the bottom or in last place, but actually saw me out in front—leading.

and...

After I married and started my family, I continued to be asked to serve in leadership positions. A farmer by trade, I found myself appointed to a board that oversaw all the federal farm programs in the state. I was also asked to serve in Washington, D.C. on a task force and commission regarding limited resource producers and businesses. I was even blessed with a national award that led to meeting with President George W. Bush. My years spent serving in state positions have given rise to a desire to do more to effect change in our national government.

and...

Now I will be obedient to the work the Lord has for me to help change the course of a nation—because my mother said I could and showed me that God knew I could. I didn’t have any special training or even display a special talent. I just needed to see myself through His eyes.
Read it all here.

This brings up an interesting question. While I don't think such public professions of faith would hurt her at all in her district, one of the points of the article is that she views herself as an agent of change for our national government. I'd take that to mean she someday has aspirations for a congressional or senatorial seat.

It's a somewhat regular occurrence with elected officials or candidates in specific group settings, such as a Right to Life rally, or a prayer breakfast. In fact, I'd argue it's expected there. But you'd have to admit in taking stock of our current statewide officials, not many discuss their faith so openly outside of those settings.

So, in South Dakota does wearing your religion on your sleeve cause problems for someone with statewide aspirations, or does it in fact help?

Comments

Anonymous said…
Certainly no lack of self-esteem...or self-importance.
Anonymous said…
It all depends on what your religion is.

One interesting thing about South Dakota, especially eastern SD id how the towns were founded around their religious denominations. Some of that is still there, and no doubt comes into play especially in local politics.

There is a lot of unspoken religious and racial predjudice in SD. Anyone denying that has simply not been paying attention.
PP said…
12:06 - that is a point I don't think I've ever heard made - but it's very true.

As much as many South Dakota towns were founded based on national origins, there is a common thread of traditional religious belief running through them.
Anonymous said…
I think it is important to allow people to know that aspect of a candidate's life. It may give a voter something they could relate with the canidate/ elected official. If you are a religious perseon, that may be important that you want an official who has the same beliefs or background.

This article may not be about the religious aspect, as must as the aspect that 11:59 AM pointed out.
Anonymous said…
Kristi Noem is Leslee Unruh's evil twin. (Who happens to dress better)
lexrex said…
it's refreshing that she wears her faith on her sleeve, without regard to politics. too many hide their faith, or even compromise it, to gain power.

but she needs to be careful about how she shares it, such as when she talks about God's plans for her to be in leadership.

she's right that through God all things are possible and i don't doubt for a second that God does plan to use her in an influential way. but if she's not careful, it can come across as mere human ambition and pride and turn off even fellow believers.
Anonymous said…
An omen from ...
Anonymous said…
This is all the reason a person needs to read Chris Hedges new book. She enbodies the danger that the dominionists pose to democracy.
Anonymous said…
He lexrex, do you have any lessons about sharing your Christian testimony with the heathens? Maybe something about your college girlfriend????
Lee Schoenbeck said…
For those of us that know Kristi in the community, and I suspect the same is true for those that have worked with her in farm organizations, she is just a hard working small business woman raising a family. I have eaten at her restraunt hundreds of times, and couldn't have told you if she was buddist, catholic, Lutheran, or some other flavor. So the implication that she "wears her faith on her sleeve" is inacurate, unless it means that she goes about her days leading a good community member life. Kristi has apparently expressed her faith views in a forum designed for that purpose, so why would anybody want to criticisize her for that. The forum seems apprpriate, and criticisizng her faith would be a biggoted act --- does Don Imus post on this blog?
lexrex said…
yes, 12:50, i am always willing to share my testimony. you want to hear it? join me for coffee or lunch someday, and we'll talk in person.
lexrex said…
good point, gov schoenbeck, but i think if you share your views in a public forum, such as on the world wide web, i don't think it's a stretch to say that you wear your faith on your sleeve.

not a big deal. i just don't want you to think i'm being "inacurate."
Anonymous said…
I don't have coffee or lunch with baby killers.
lexrex said…
but i bet you'll vote for them, won't you, 12:58?
Anonymous said…
There are some voters who would be excited to vote for a candidate who believed that they were called by God to public office to serve His calling in life.

Others would have some serious problems with it.

Cuts both ways.
Pro-Life and PROUD!!!! said…
Please stop attacking Rob for sharing his Christian testimony. Yeah, he paid for an abortion. But he has repented for it and is working to stop abortion. He's more than paid his price for his actions and you people should leave him alone. If you're in favor of abortion being legal, then why would you attack Rob for paying for one? That's totally hypocritical.
Anonymous said…
Hypocritical?

What about the fact that Rob participated in an act that he now wants to criminalize? He took advantage of his legal right to terminate a pregnency and now wants to criminalize that same act. That's the epitome of hypocrisy.

You say that he has repented and has thus "paid his price," but I doubt he'd support a "repent" exception to a ban on abortion.

Hypocritical is also saying that you're for personal responsibility, but using your personal guilt - arising from a decision that you made - to try to limit choices for others.
Anonymous said…
1:13, 1:25 ... what are you talking about?
Anonymous said…
One of the Blogmore people is pushing the Hedges book. Judging from the style of writing (snooty) I think it is the same person who is posting here. So has anybody read it?
Anonymous said…
Faith is shown in deeds toward your fellow man as well as words. Here's an except from today's RC Journal concerning pp's favorite Republican:

"Local businessman, philanthropist and former state legislator Stan Adelstein stepped forward to help the Rapid City Council and Dahl officials overcome a last-minute snag and move that project forward.

The city finance officer last week had recommended delaying the Dahl contract because the money raised by the arts community was not all in hand. So Adelstein offered a $1.3 million loan, for which he will be reimbursed when the money is transferred.

He also bailed The Journey Museum out of financial difficulty some years ago, and has been a longtime valued and reliable patron of the arts in Rapid City, which is why the Allied Arts Fund honored Adelstein in March for his contributions."
Anonymous said…
Oh jeez, 2:31, don't get PP started in Adelstein again. It's been like 3 days since we've had an Adelstein post, and I thought we might be headed for a record.
Anonymous said…
People who do good deeds should do them because it is the right thing to do, not for the recognition. Stan likes to write checks. That's nice. But I wonder how many he writes anonymously, without fanfare and publicity.
Anonymous said…
1:50pm -- Lexrex (or Rob Regier, former head of the South Dakota Family Policy Coucil) admitted to paying for a girlfriend's abortion while he was in college.

Some think it's hypocritical that he now pushes to make abortions illegal.
Anonymous said…
Here is a bit of Kristi Noem trivia. What former US Senator did Krisit befriend to get named to the State FSA Board?

Any guesses? It was Senator Tom Daschle. So, because Daschle got Clinton to appoint her to the FSA committee, does that make her evil?
Anonymous said…
Beware of those that wear their religion on their sleeve, it should be in the heart. Where did this woman come from? Liberty University or Oral Roberts?
Anonymous said…
4:57-- Do you have anything to prove that information?
VJ said…
Does anybody know? What happens when you have a Democrat and a Republican who both believe that they were called by God to public office to serve His calling in life and these two are running against each other? What in the world does God do? Or is God a Republican? Or what about when a victorious sports team says “God was with them tonight”. Does that mean God was against the other team? Just wondering.
Anonymous said…
1:25 An Ad hominem attack? If you’re who I think you are, I thought you were above that.
d.b
Anonymous said…
6:55,

You seem defensive. But here are the facts. She was a member of the South Dakota Farm Service Agency State Committee during the Clinton Administration. Members are appointed by the President, that would be Clinton, and I am sure the recommendation came from Senator Daschle.

Yes, Noem was a Clinton appointee. Recommended by Daschle. It doesn't take a rocket Scientist to figure out that at some point she had a positive working relationship with Daschle. So back to my original question 6:55, does that make her "evil"?

Many a conservative blogger who have posted on this site have basically said that anybody who associated themselves with Daschle or Clinton were a part of a anti-Christian liberal conspiracy and could not be trusted. I just want to know if that same logic applies to Representative Noem...by the way, I think she may have even attended one of Daschle's leadership camps.
Anonymous said…
I wonder how many people here would feel if a Rep/Sen openly proclaimed he/she was an athiest?

How many Christians would be happy to hear that? I doubt they would be very tolerant.
Anonymous said…
What a self-absorbed twit! How do morons like this get elected?
Anonymous said…
2:00: That is odd, considering District 6 is, arguably, the most conservative district in South Dakota.

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